Breaking Bounds  (1992) is Greenfield’s first book, showcasing her groundbreaking images of dance as can never be seen on the stage . Unrestrained by choreography, the dancers in her photographs defy both logic and gravity.   William A. Ewing and Lois Greenfield. Breaking Bounds. Chronicle Books (USA), Thames & Hudson (UK), 1992.

Breaking Bounds (1992) is Greenfield’s first book, showcasing her groundbreaking images of dance as can never be seen on the stage . Unrestrained by choreography, the dancers in her photographs defy both logic and gravity.

William A. Ewing and Lois Greenfield. Breaking Bounds. Chronicle Books (USA), Thames & Hudson (UK), 1992.

  DAVID PARSONS   I love impossible looking situations that allude to the moments before and after the shutter’s click. I want the viewer to wonder, “Where is he coming from? How will he land?”

DAVID PARSONS

I love impossible looking situations that allude to the moments before and after the shutter’s click. I want the viewer to wonder, “Where is he coming from? How will he land?”

  DANIEL EZRALOW AND DAVID PARSONS   Initially the cropping of figures was accidental. I later realized that this strategy invites the viewer to think about offscreen space, and reconceptualize the force of gravity.

DANIEL EZRALOW AND DAVID PARSONS

Initially the cropping of figures was accidental. I later realized that this strategy invites the viewer to think about offscreen space, and reconceptualize the force of gravity.

  DAVID PARSONS   Freed from the constraints of performing choreography, Dave had a try anything approach.

DAVID PARSONS

Freed from the constraints of performing choreography, Dave had a try anything approach.

  JULIE WEST, POONIE DODSON, AMY PIVAR, BILL T. JONES, " Freedom of Information",  BILL T. JONES/ ARNIE ZANE DANCE COMPANY   This shot was composed like a still life, with each dancer describing his own shape in the air.

JULIE WEST, POONIE DODSON, AMY PIVAR, BILL T. JONES, "Freedom of Information", BILL T. JONES/ ARNIE ZANE DANCE COMPANY

This shot was composed like a still life, with each dancer describing his own shape in the air.

  DAVID PARSONS   In this shot I built an actual frame for Dave to jump through, which  simulates the black border on film negatives, like most of my photos from that era.

DAVID PARSONS

In this shot I built an actual frame for Dave to jump through, which  simulates the black border on film negatives, like most of my photos from that era.

  DANIEL EZRALOW AND ASHLEY ROLAND   This moment could never be repeated, not even by Danny and Ashley themselves. Like many of my pictures, this is a uniquely photographic event. It only exists for a 500th of a second.

DANIEL EZRALOW AND ASHLEY ROLAND

This moment could never be repeated, not even by Danny and Ashley themselves. Like many of my pictures, this is a uniquely photographic event. It only exists for a 500th of a second.

  JACK GALLAGHER AND ASHLEY ROLAND   The camera's ability to stop time and reveal what the naked eye can't see makes this moment, with Ashley securely balancing on her hair, look surreal.

JACK GALLAGHER AND ASHLEY ROLAND

The camera's ability to stop time and reveal what the naked eye can't see makes this moment, with Ashley securely balancing on her hair, look surreal.

  JANET LILLY, BILL T. JONES, HEIDI LATSKY, " Chatter",  BILL T. JONES/ARNIE ZANE DANCE COMPANY   I never use photoshop to combine or rearrange the dancers in my photos. In this shot the two female dancers are each leaning backwards into the frame, which cropped out the ladders they were hanging from.

JANET LILLY, BILL T. JONES, HEIDI LATSKY, "Chatter", BILL T. JONES/ARNIE ZANE DANCE COMPANY

I never use photoshop to combine or rearrange the dancers in my photos. In this shot the two female dancers are each leaning backwards into the frame, which cropped out the ladders they were hanging from.

  DANIEL EZRALOW   Most of my work with Danny comes out of a feeling of freedom and improvisation, not from choreography.

DANIEL EZRALOW

Most of my work with Danny comes out of a feeling of freedom and improvisation, not from choreography.

  DANIEL EZRALOW   I love to capture those moments when chaos coheres into a seemingly impossible configuration.

DANIEL EZRALOW

I love to capture those moments when chaos coheres into a seemingly impossible configuration.

  GAIL GILBERT AND DAVID PARSONS   This photo has always reminded me of classical Italian sculpture, perhaps illustrating the biblical story of the Expulsion from Paradise.

GAIL GILBERT AND DAVID PARSONS

This photo has always reminded me of classical Italian sculpture, perhaps illustrating the biblical story of the Expulsion from Paradise.

  ASHLEY ROLAND   This is one of my first photographs using material. Here the fabric seems to both support and transform her.

ASHLEY ROLAND

This is one of my first photographs using material. Here the fabric seems to both support and transform her.

  DANIEL EZRALOW    Working with dancers allows miraculous moments to happen that I never would have dreamed of.

DANIEL EZRALOW

Working with dancers allows miraculous moments to happen that I never would have dreamed of.

  Breaking Bounds  (1992) is Greenfield’s first book, showcasing her groundbreaking images of dance as can never be seen on the stage . Unrestrained by choreography, the dancers in her photographs defy both logic and gravity.   William A. Ewing and Lois Greenfield. Breaking Bounds. Chronicle Books (USA), Thames & Hudson (UK), 1992.
  DAVID PARSONS   I love impossible looking situations that allude to the moments before and after the shutter’s click. I want the viewer to wonder, “Where is he coming from? How will he land?”
  DANIEL EZRALOW AND DAVID PARSONS   Initially the cropping of figures was accidental. I later realized that this strategy invites the viewer to think about offscreen space, and reconceptualize the force of gravity.
  DAVID PARSONS   Freed from the constraints of performing choreography, Dave had a try anything approach.
  JULIE WEST, POONIE DODSON, AMY PIVAR, BILL T. JONES, " Freedom of Information",  BILL T. JONES/ ARNIE ZANE DANCE COMPANY   This shot was composed like a still life, with each dancer describing his own shape in the air.
  DAVID PARSONS   In this shot I built an actual frame for Dave to jump through, which  simulates the black border on film negatives, like most of my photos from that era.
  DANIEL EZRALOW AND ASHLEY ROLAND   This moment could never be repeated, not even by Danny and Ashley themselves. Like many of my pictures, this is a uniquely photographic event. It only exists for a 500th of a second.
  JACK GALLAGHER AND ASHLEY ROLAND   The camera's ability to stop time and reveal what the naked eye can't see makes this moment, with Ashley securely balancing on her hair, look surreal.
  JANET LILLY, BILL T. JONES, HEIDI LATSKY, " Chatter",  BILL T. JONES/ARNIE ZANE DANCE COMPANY   I never use photoshop to combine or rearrange the dancers in my photos. In this shot the two female dancers are each leaning backwards into the frame, which cropped out the ladders they were hanging from.
  DANIEL EZRALOW   Most of my work with Danny comes out of a feeling of freedom and improvisation, not from choreography.
  DANIEL EZRALOW   I love to capture those moments when chaos coheres into a seemingly impossible configuration.
  GAIL GILBERT AND DAVID PARSONS   This photo has always reminded me of classical Italian sculpture, perhaps illustrating the biblical story of the Expulsion from Paradise.
  ASHLEY ROLAND   This is one of my first photographs using material. Here the fabric seems to both support and transform her.
  DANIEL EZRALOW    Working with dancers allows miraculous moments to happen that I never would have dreamed of.

Breaking Bounds (1992) is Greenfield’s first book, showcasing her groundbreaking images of dance as can never be seen on the stage . Unrestrained by choreography, the dancers in her photographs defy both logic and gravity.

William A. Ewing and Lois Greenfield. Breaking Bounds. Chronicle Books (USA), Thames & Hudson (UK), 1992.

DAVID PARSONS

I love impossible looking situations that allude to the moments before and after the shutter’s click. I want the viewer to wonder, “Where is he coming from? How will he land?”

DANIEL EZRALOW AND DAVID PARSONS

Initially the cropping of figures was accidental. I later realized that this strategy invites the viewer to think about offscreen space, and reconceptualize the force of gravity.

DAVID PARSONS

Freed from the constraints of performing choreography, Dave had a try anything approach.

JULIE WEST, POONIE DODSON, AMY PIVAR, BILL T. JONES, "Freedom of Information", BILL T. JONES/ ARNIE ZANE DANCE COMPANY

This shot was composed like a still life, with each dancer describing his own shape in the air.

DAVID PARSONS

In this shot I built an actual frame for Dave to jump through, which  simulates the black border on film negatives, like most of my photos from that era.

DANIEL EZRALOW AND ASHLEY ROLAND

This moment could never be repeated, not even by Danny and Ashley themselves. Like many of my pictures, this is a uniquely photographic event. It only exists for a 500th of a second.

JACK GALLAGHER AND ASHLEY ROLAND

The camera's ability to stop time and reveal what the naked eye can't see makes this moment, with Ashley securely balancing on her hair, look surreal.

JANET LILLY, BILL T. JONES, HEIDI LATSKY, "Chatter", BILL T. JONES/ARNIE ZANE DANCE COMPANY

I never use photoshop to combine or rearrange the dancers in my photos. In this shot the two female dancers are each leaning backwards into the frame, which cropped out the ladders they were hanging from.

DANIEL EZRALOW

Most of my work with Danny comes out of a feeling of freedom and improvisation, not from choreography.

DANIEL EZRALOW

I love to capture those moments when chaos coheres into a seemingly impossible configuration.

GAIL GILBERT AND DAVID PARSONS

This photo has always reminded me of classical Italian sculpture, perhaps illustrating the biblical story of the Expulsion from Paradise.

ASHLEY ROLAND

This is one of my first photographs using material. Here the fabric seems to both support and transform her.

DANIEL EZRALOW

Working with dancers allows miraculous moments to happen that I never would have dreamed of.

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